reblogged 3 months ago
15 Jun 2014 31,916 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #women in science  

Q: Girls are discouraged? That sounds so 1970s.

A: There was a 2001 study that showed in fourth grade, 68% of boys and 66% of girls like science. Starting in sixth, seventh and eighth grade, we lose girls and boys, but we lose more girls and for different reasons: lingering stereotypes, societal pressures. It’s well known that many girls have a tendency to dumb down when they’re in middle school. Just last week, I was talking to senior executives, and a woman told me that she was the best biology student in high school and had the highest exam scores. At the end of the semester, a teacher told her: “I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to give the award in biology to a boy, because it’s more important to him.” Almost every time that I give a speech or meet with a group of women, I’ll hear such stories.

Q: Boys earn 70% of the D’s and F’s in school and account for 80% of dropouts. Shouldn’t we fear more for their future?

A: It’s a big problem. Women earn the majority of undergraduate degrees in the U.S. and last year earned more Ph.D.s than men. But keeping girls in the science and math pipeline is a separate problem with different causes. It’s important we address both. You don’t stop research on breast cancer just because heart disease is also deadly. You work on both.

Q: Suppose you were an executive of a corporation that needs engineers. You meet a girl in high school. She scored in the 99th percentile in math on her SATs, yet says she wants to major in psychology or go to law school, because those careers sound more interesting. What do you tell her?

A: I’d introduce her to the coolest female engineer in the company. Girls tend to have a stereotype of engineers being 65-year-old guys who wear lab coats and pocket protectors and look like Einstein. Try to make it personal to them and show them some of the cool things that they can do in engineering.

Q: Let’s talk Lawrence Summers. The Harvard president recently resigned after giving a controversial speech a year ago suggesting that men might simply be predisposed to be better at math and science. Is there at least a grain of truth in what he said?

A: (Laughs). Suppose you came across a woman lying on the street with an elephant sitting on her chest. You notice she is short of breath. Shortness of breath can be a symptom of heart problems. In her case, the much more likely cause is the elephant on her chest.

For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences. That is the elephant. Until the playing field has been leveled and lingering stereotypes are gone, you can’t even ask the question.

Q: I will anyway. There are many obvious biological differences between men and women. This can’t be one?

A: There are obvious differences, but until you eliminate the more obvious cause, it’s difficult to get at the question scientifically. Look at law, medicine and business. In 1970 — that’s not ancient history — law school was 5% female, med school was 8% and business school was 4%. You could have taken a look at those numbers and concluded that women don’t make good lawyers or doctors. The statistics might have supported you. But today, all of those fields are about 50-50.

~Sally Ride (the first American woman in space) giving awesome answers to insipid questions in this interview.  (via itsawomansworld2)  
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reblogged 3 months ago
15 Jun 2014 161,737 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #women in science  

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

~Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)  
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reblogged 3 months ago
15 Jun 2014 102,936 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #women in science  
theuppitynegras:

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

dynastylnoire:

luringgud:

purloinedinpetrograd:

A Harvard Woman Figured Out How To 3D Print Makeup From Any Home Computer, And The Demo Is Mindblowing

Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She did a little research and realized that beauty brands create and then majorly mark up their products by mixing lots of colors.
[…]
Choi created her own mini home 3D printer, Mink, that will retail for $300 and allow anyone to print makeup by ripping the color code off color photos on the internet. It hooks up to a computer, just like a normal printer. [x]

this is it folks. the future is here, and apparently it is going to look goddamn beautiful.

soon

YES GOD!!!!

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSS

THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF ALL TIME

theuppitynegras:

blackmagicalgirlmisandry:

dynastylnoire:

luringgud:

purloinedinpetrograd:

A Harvard Woman Figured Out How To 3D Print Makeup From Any Home Computer, And The Demo Is Mindblowing

Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She did a little research and realized that beauty brands create and then majorly mark up their products by mixing lots of colors.

[…]

Choi created her own mini home 3D printer, Mink, that will retail for $300 and allow anyone to print makeup by ripping the color code off color photos on the internet. It hooks up to a computer, just like a normal printer. [x]

this is it folks. the future is here, and apparently it is going to look goddamn beautiful.

soon

YES GOD!!!!

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSS

THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF ALL TIME

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reblogged 3 months ago
15 Jun 2014 23,259 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #women in science  
ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.

ladieslovescience:

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

A+ YES. Fabulous ladies getting it DONE.

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reblogged 4 months ago
23 May 2014 1,488 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #nebulas  
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reblogged 4 months ago
23 May 2014 687 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #space    #galaxies  
sci-universe:

In the Center of Spiral Galaxy M61 Credit:  ESA/Hubble, NASA

sci-universe:

In the Center of Spiral Galaxy M61 
Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA

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reblogged 4 months ago
23 May 2014 42,334 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #space  

infinity-imagined:

Comet Lovejoy approaching the Sun, photographed on December 13th, 2013 by Gerald Rhemann.

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reblogged 4 months ago
09 May 2014 106 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #technology  
laboratoryequipment:

New Plastics Grow Back After DamageLooking at a smooth sheet of plastic in one Univ. of Illinois laboratory, no one would guess that an impact had recently blasted a hole through it. Illinois researchers have developed materials that not only heal, but regenerate. Until now, self-repairing materials could only bond tiny microscopic cracks. The new regenerating materials fill in large cracks and holes by regrowing material.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/new-plastics-grow-back-after-damage

laboratoryequipment:

New Plastics Grow Back After Damage

Looking at a smooth sheet of plastic in one Univ. of Illinois laboratory, no one would guess that an impact had recently blasted a hole through it. Illinois researchers have developed materials that not only heal, but regenerate. Until now, self-repairing materials could only bond tiny microscopic cracks. The new regenerating materials fill in large cracks and holes by regrowing material.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/05/new-plastics-grow-back-after-damage

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reblogged 4 months ago
09 May 2014 179 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #art    #insects  
ooksaidthelibrarian:

n61_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Via Flickr: An epitome of the natural history of the insects of India :. London,Printed for the author by T. Bensley, Bolt Court, Fleet Street; and sold by Messrs, Rivingtons, Str. Paul’s Church Yard; White, Fleet Street, Faulder, Bond Street; and H. D. Symonds, Patersonter Row,1800..biodiversitylibrary.org/page/25495000

ooksaidthelibrarian:

n61_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
An epitome of the natural history of the insects of India :.
London,Printed for the author by T. Bensley, Bolt Court, Fleet Street; and sold by Messrs, Rivingtons, Str. Paul’s Church Yard; White, Fleet Street, Faulder, Bond Street; and H. D. Symonds, Patersonter Row,1800..
biodiversitylibrary.org/page/25495000

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reblogged 4 months ago
30 Apr 2014 107 notes
FILED UNDER:
  #disease  

neurosciencestuff:

Tell-tail MRI image diagnosis for Parkinson’s disease

An image similar in shape to a Swallow’s tail has been identified as a new and accurate test for Parkinson’s disease. The image, which depicts the healthy state of a group of cells in the sub-region of the human brain, was singled out using 3T MRI scanning technology – standard equipment in clinical settings today.

The research was led by Dr Stefan Schwarz and Professor Dorothee Auer, experts in neuroradiology in the School of Medicine at The University of Nottingham and was carried out at the Queen’s Medical Centre in collaboration with Dr Nin Bajaj, an expert in Movement Disorder Diseases at the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.

The findings have been published in the open access academic journal PLOS one.

The work builds on a successful collaboration with Professor Penny Gowland at the Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre at The University of Nottingham.

‘The ‘Swallow Tail’ Appearance of the Healthy Nigrosome – A New Accurate Test of Parkinson’s Disease: A Case-Control and Retrospective Cross-Sectional MRI Study at 3T’ – describes how the absence of this imaging sign can help to diagnose  Parkinson’s disease using standard clinical Magnetic Resonance Scanners.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which destroys brain cells that control movement. Around 127,000 people in the UK have the disease. Currently there is no cure but drugs and treatments can be taken to manage the symptoms.

The challenges of diagnosing Parkinson’s

Until now diagnosing Parkinson’s in clinically uncertain cases has been limited to expensive nuclear medical techniques. The diagnosis can be challenging early in the course of the condition and in tremor dominant cases.  Other non-licensed diagnostic techniques offer a varying range of accuracy, repeatability and reliability but none of them have demonstrated the required accuracy and ease of use to allow translation into standard clinical practice.

Using high resolution, ultra high filed 7T magnetic resonance imaging the Nottingham research team has already pinpointed the characteristic pathology of Parkinson’s with structural change in a small area of the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. The latest study has shown that these changes can also be detected using 3T MRI technology which is accessible in hospitals across the country. They subsequently coined the phrase the ‘swallow tail appearance’ as an easy recognizable sign of the healthy appearing substantia nigra which is lost in Parkinson’s disease. A total of 114 high-resolution scans were reviewed and in 94 per cent of cases the diagnosis was accurately made using this technique.

New findings give new hope

Dr Schwarz said: “This is a breakthrough finding as currently Parkinson’s disease is mostly diagnosed by identifying symptoms like stiffness and tremor. Imaging tests to confirm the diagnosis are limited to expensive nuclear medical techniques which are not widely available and associated with potentially harmful ionizing radiation.

“Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (no ionizing radiation involved and much cheaper than nuclear medical techniques) we identified a specific imaging feature which has great similarity to a tail of a swallow and therefore decided to call it the ‘swallow tail sign’. This sign is absent in Parkinson’s disease.”

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